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Weekly reading list #3

Another week, another reading list. The past days have been packed with readings. I am trying to navigate a full-time job, studying for GRE and, oh well, reading as much as I can. A classic anti-gig economy piece in The Guardian. You might have come across it already as I did several times. I am following […]

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Blog weekly

Weekly reading list #2

This week was a busy one with a lot of readings on my list. An interesting development was the award of the Nobel prize in economics to Richard Thaler. Many praised the work of the academic who masterfully translated theories from psychology into economics. Many critics accused economics of imperialism. Nudging the economists is a brilliant piece on behaviour economics. […]

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Blog weekly

Weekly reading list

I will start curating a reading list featuring the best articles or research pieces that I encounter in a week. It was an idea that came from a long-time academic friend. And why not? I read a lot of stuff and I would be more than happy to share with all the readers a short […]

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On unproductive, ritualistic meetings

Just read a brilliant article in The Guardin about how meetings have become a ritualistic way of spending time in modern organisation. They lack any substance and most of them are enemies to health and productivity. “The meeting has become the ceremony of executive importance: who calls it, who chairs it, who presents to it, […]

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Romanian politics in crisis… again

The 6 months old Romanian government is subjected to a non-confidence vote today after the party that supported it (and whose members are part of) withdrew this support in an unprecedented power play. The leader of the Social Democrats and the prime minister are two different persons. The reasons is that the leader (Dragnea) couldn’t […]

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On elections in Britain

The British voted twice in less than two years for their MPs. Fast forward from the last vote, May pushes for early elections to consolidate her majority and silence her critics. This would have also worked in the negotiations with the EU. With a 20% lead in polls a month ago, May felt confident that the yesterday’s […]

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Are markets disciplined?

I came across a very intriguing academic article published by Cato Institute, the famous think-tank for the furtherance of free markets. It said that economists need to construct a moral argument, or at least integrate the idea of morality into their economic models in order to protect themselves from unwitty comments and esoteric arguments coming […]

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Unsafe academia

I’ve just received an e-mail on one of the mailing lists I am subscribed to about the massive staff cut planned at the University of Manchester.  About 171 positions are set for redundancy, out of which 40 tenured academics in the business school. Apparently, the cuts are planned to support some new “strategic” investments in […]

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Another one on Brexit

This is a shorter article than usual. I’ve just came back from England, the country I lived in for 2 years. I left exactly before Brexit happened and I watched in shock how the polls were wrong in predicting the catastrophe. Almost one year after the event, I went back to a divided Britain. Brexit […]

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The myth of egalitarianism in Germany

An increasing number of doctors in Germany are accepting only patients that are privately insured. In order to have private insurance, you need to earn above a certain threshold (4350 euros per month). They switch to private insurance because it pays better and they can claim more money from, let’s say, a normal visit. So, […]